Local tenants set to get estate priority

Oxford Mail: An artist’s impression of the planned Barton West development An artist’s impression of the planned Barton West development

TENANTS from Barton, Headington, Northway and Marston could be given priority to move into social housing on the new Barton Park estate, it has emerged.

The new estate with 885 homes, will also feature a new primary school, shops, sports pitches and a community hub.

Barton residents expressed fears last month that the name Barton Park was an attempt to distinguish it from the current estate.

But a way of improving integration between the two estates was highlighted at a briefing for city councillors on Tuesday.

Development company Gros-venor is working on the plans with Oxford City Council. Cllr Colin Cook, executive member for city development, said people in housing need from the Barton estate could be given priority for homes in Barton Park, with at least 40 per cent of the new homes designated as social housing.

He said: “The social housing is going to be seeded with people in housing need both from Barton and Northway.”

Mr Cook told the Oxford Mail that the idea of giving Barton people in housing need priority for new homes on Barton Park was “do-able”.

He added: “The formal policy has not yet been sorted but we do have some discretion regarding the housing list.

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“If you have someone from the Barton estate and someone from Cutteslowe with the same housing need, then the person from Barton would be given priority for a home on the new estate.

“But if the person from the Cutteslowe estate has the greater housing need they would get priority.

“We have an allocations policy and we would have to tweak that.

“If we free up a house in Barton then someone else from the Barton estate could move in.”

Van Coulter, city councillor for Barton, said: “People are still very much concerned and as the first homes will be built nearer Northway and Marston then the natural integration will be with Northway and Marston.”

Outline planning permission for Barton Park was granted last year and now reserved matters are to be considered on access, the planned community hub, sports pitches, and allotments.

The public will be consulted in April on what they would like on Barton Park’s green spaces.

Building work on new homes could start in the summer next year with families moving in by 2016.

A public inquiry is to take place on July 7 into whether land at Foxwell Drive could become a town green. Access to Barton Park is planned via a bridge over the A40 into Northway that would cut through green space at Foxwell Drive.

Comments (8)

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11:16am Thu 6 Mar 14

bart-on simpson says...

Barton West? (So 2010)

Barton Park? (2013)

Barton (2014 onwards)

The Royal Mail is calling it Headington, like the rest of Barton.

By the way, has Jed D got his raffle ticket for the "seeding"?
Barton West? (So 2010) Barton Park? (2013) Barton (2014 onwards) The Royal Mail is calling it Headington, like the rest of Barton. By the way, has Jed D got his raffle ticket for the "seeding"? bart-on simpson
  • Score: 0

12:37pm Thu 6 Mar 14

alu355 says...

Sounds to me like the old Barton will become even more of a ghetto
Sounds to me like the old Barton will become even more of a ghetto alu355
  • Score: -1

1:00pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

They really aren't thinking ahead are they?

It doesn't seem that long since there were articles in "The Oxford Mail" concerning funding for improvments to heritage housing in Barton...

Now we are finding that some of the residents could well be given the opportunity to move to a brand new energy efficient house - thus leaving the heritage housing empty.

Given the fairly vast footprint of some of the heritage housing, there'll be an opportunity to demolish and build more modern, narrower but taller town houses instead...
They really aren't thinking ahead are they? It doesn't seem that long since there were articles in "The Oxford Mail" concerning funding for improvments to heritage housing in Barton... Now we are finding that some of the residents could well be given the opportunity to move to a brand new energy efficient house - thus leaving the heritage housing empty. Given the fairly vast footprint of some of the heritage housing, there'll be an opportunity to demolish and build more modern, narrower but taller town houses instead... Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: 1

1:02pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Danny A says...

Interesting use of the developer term "Seeded".
I can see how the developer can be persuaded into accepting early occupation. Much easier to sell units if there are already signs of life on an estate.
Interesting use of the developer term "Seeded". I can see how the developer can be persuaded into accepting early occupation. Much easier to sell units if there are already signs of life on an estate. Danny A
  • Score: 1

1:09pm Thu 6 Mar 14

alu355 says...

Danny A wrote:
Interesting use of the developer term "Seeded".
I can see how the developer can be persuaded into accepting early occupation. Much easier to sell units if there are already signs of life on an estate.
Not sure if that is true if all the early occupants are council tenants although I guess they might segregate them off onto a part of the estate
[quote][p][bold]Danny A[/bold] wrote: Interesting use of the developer term "Seeded". I can see how the developer can be persuaded into accepting early occupation. Much easier to sell units if there are already signs of life on an estate.[/p][/quote]Not sure if that is true if all the early occupants are council tenants although I guess they might segregate them off onto a part of the estate alu355
  • Score: -1

3:00pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

alu355 wrote:
Danny A wrote:
Interesting use of the developer term "Seeded".
I can see how the developer can be persuaded into accepting early occupation. Much easier to sell units if there are already signs of life on an estate.
Not sure if that is true if all the early occupants are council tenants although I guess they might segregate them off onto a part of the estate
No segregation these days. It's not like the olden days of the Cutteslowe wall.

Communities are "blended" with both private and public sector housing in the same street.
[quote][p][bold]alu355[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Danny A[/bold] wrote: Interesting use of the developer term "Seeded". I can see how the developer can be persuaded into accepting early occupation. Much easier to sell units if there are already signs of life on an estate.[/p][/quote]Not sure if that is true if all the early occupants are council tenants although I guess they might segregate them off onto a part of the estate[/p][/quote]No segregation these days. It's not like the olden days of the Cutteslowe wall. Communities are "blended" with both private and public sector housing in the same street. Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: 2

3:07pm Thu 6 Mar 14

WitneyGreen says...

Andrew:Oxford wrote:
alu355 wrote:
Danny A wrote:
Interesting use of the developer term "Seeded".
I can see how the developer can be persuaded into accepting early occupation. Much easier to sell units if there are already signs of life on an estate.
Not sure if that is true if all the early occupants are council tenants although I guess they might segregate them off onto a part of the estate
No segregation these days. It's not like the olden days of the Cutteslowe wall.

Communities are "blended" with both private and public sector housing in the same street.
I live in such a development. It's very easy to see which houses are privately owned and which are local authority tenants.
[quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alu355[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Danny A[/bold] wrote: Interesting use of the developer term "Seeded". I can see how the developer can be persuaded into accepting early occupation. Much easier to sell units if there are already signs of life on an estate.[/p][/quote]Not sure if that is true if all the early occupants are council tenants although I guess they might segregate them off onto a part of the estate[/p][/quote]No segregation these days. It's not like the olden days of the Cutteslowe wall. Communities are "blended" with both private and public sector housing in the same street.[/p][/quote]I live in such a development. It's very easy to see which houses are privately owned and which are local authority tenants. WitneyGreen
  • Score: -1

10:45pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Tidkin says...

The comments of WitneyGreen are both offensive and inaccurate. It is not easy to see which houses are privately owned as MANY privately owned houses across the city and county are now rented out. The owners of these homes only care about lining their pockets and the homes are not looked after - if the landlord doesn't care then why should the tenant. You will find such homes in ALL parts of Oxfordshire and most streets now - so Witneygreen should watch out if the house next door to him goes on the market.

P.S. Do not judge Barton - it is a mix like most areas now but includes many people who work hard for the local NHS, including nurses and even doctors.
The comments of WitneyGreen are both offensive and inaccurate. It is not easy to see which houses are privately owned as MANY privately owned houses across the city and county are now rented out. The owners of these homes only care about lining their pockets and the homes are not looked after - if the landlord doesn't care then why should the tenant. You will find such homes in ALL parts of Oxfordshire and most streets now - so Witneygreen should watch out if the house next door to him goes on the market. P.S. Do not judge Barton - it is a mix like most areas now but includes many people who work hard for the local NHS, including nurses and even doctors. Tidkin
  • Score: 0

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