OXFORD SENIOR CITIZENS' FILM FESTIVAL: Event set to be a cracker

Oxford Mail: From left, Matt Taylor, Luisa Bucciero, Christine Norburn, Richard Hopkins and John Hancock of Sainsbury’s, and Jeremy Smith From left, Matt Taylor, Luisa Bucciero, Christine Norburn, Richard Hopkins and John Hancock of Sainsbury’s, and Jeremy Smith

THE sixth annual Oxford Senior Citizens’ Film Festival will be the best yet, according to the organisers.

Co-sponsored by the Oxford Mail and the Phoenix Picturehouse in Walton Street, Jericho, the three-day festive get-together is also supported by Sainbury’s Kidlington and Westgate, which have donated gift vouchers, champagne and chocolates to give away over the course of the event.

Jeremy Smith, entertainments editor for the Oxford Mail, said this year’s three films were almost made-to-order for the seasonal feel-good occasion.

He said: “To open with this year’s surprise comedy hit The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, close with the multi-Oscar winning The Artist and have Salmon Fishing in The Yemen sandwiched between the two is a Christmas present in itself.”

Matt Taylor, manager of the Phoenix said: “We always love staging this Christmas cracker.

“It’s a much-loved date in the festive calendar.”

All films start at 11am and your ticket is simply of copy of that day’s Oxford Mail – but don’t worry if you forget to take your copy along as we’ll be selling them in the foyer.

The mini-festival starts tomorrow with The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. Wednesday’s cinematic treat is Salmon Fishing In The Yemen and Thursday’s closing presentation is The Artist.

For further information, contact the Phoenix Picturehouse on 01865 316570 or Jeremy Smith at the Oxford Mail on 01865 425435.

Comments (1)

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5:56am Tue 11 Dec 12

Myron Blatz says...

Why do people keep banging-on so patronisingly about 'over 50s' and 'senior citizens' when they really mean old people? By Law, we are not now supposed to discrimate because of age, and most people who are now well over 60 - let alone 50! - are fitter and more active than were people of that age group in the 1970s. Nor does everyone now retire when they are 65 - and the naff 'gilt carriate clock for long service' is no longer the prize it once was - if only because few people stay in the same job 'for life' any more. Frankly, most people I know who are of retirement age or older, don't go to tea dances, bingo, or coach trips to a nuclear power station by the sea, but travel to distant places (further north than Banbury!) and watch films on their i-pads or laptop computers! Yes, the proportion of 'people of retirement age' within our communities is growing, but not everyone becomes consigned to the 'grannie bin' once they hit 65 - especially since many now become grandparents when only in their 40s! Likewise, ethis '50-plus' cover-all, as a 'politically correct' way of describing older people - or is it simply to try and hide the fact that (hopefully) we all get older?
Why do people keep banging-on so patronisingly about 'over 50s' and 'senior citizens' when they really mean old people? By Law, we are not now supposed to discrimate because of age, and most people who are now well over 60 - let alone 50! - are fitter and more active than were people of that age group in the 1970s. Nor does everyone now retire when they are 65 - and the naff 'gilt carriate clock for long service' is no longer the prize it once was - if only because few people stay in the same job 'for life' any more. Frankly, most people I know who are of retirement age or older, don't go to tea dances, bingo, or coach trips to a nuclear power station by the sea, but travel to distant places (further north than Banbury!) and watch films on their i-pads or laptop computers! Yes, the proportion of 'people of retirement age' within our communities is growing, but not everyone becomes consigned to the 'grannie bin' once they hit 65 - especially since many now become grandparents when only in their 40s! Likewise, ethis '50-plus' cover-all, as a 'politically correct' way of describing older people - or is it simply to try and hide the fact that (hopefully) we all get older? Myron Blatz

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