Report this comment
  • "
    LORD PETER MACVEY 0X2 6EG wrote:
    guinness lover wrote: I did not realize how simple the problem with Pubs and Clubs closing was to solve, just let in the smokers. There was me thinking it had a lot to do with the longest, deepest recession this country has seen for many years, that people just don’t have the money to spend socializing in Pubs and Clubs. Alcohol can be bought in Supermarkets for a third to half the price paid in Pubs, tell me that has no effect on Pub and club trade. One large Pub chain are well known for asset stripping, they don’t care if the Pubs are profitable, they run them down then sell them off for building land, especially the large ones with a lot of ground. Send in the smokers to save the Pubs, I don’t think so.
    They started closing en masse just after the ban, and before the recession. Why are you so scared to let landlords choose, and see which pubs regain their trade. That is the only way to find out in a democracy, or are you happy to live in a dictatorship, do NOT forget in the government that banned it's manifesto it PROMISED to give landlords the choice, so to go back on that smacks of dictatorship.
    I still maintain the smoking ban only played a very small part in the decline of the British Pub. I go to the Pub 4-5 times a week and know a lot of smokers, I don’t know of any who don’t use a Pub since the ban. The drink, drive started the decline in a lot of village Pubs, this has been more actively pursued in recent years."
  • This field is mandatory
  • This field is mandatory
  • Please note we will not accept reports with HTML tags or URLs in them.


  • Enter the above word in the box below

End of an era for social club

End of an era for social club

End of an era for social club

End of an era for social club

First published in Oxford Oxford Mail: Photograph of the Author by , Health reporter, also covering Kidlington. Call me on 01865 425271

A closed social club in South Oxford will be turned into flats under new plans.

Former South Oxford Social Club member Terence Butler bought the Gordon Street club, which closed in 2010 as its membership dropped.

Its planned redevelopment marks the end of 72 years of history for the club, which began life as the South Oxford Civil Defence Club in 1940.

Planning agent Alan Allinson said the venue could not be run as a going concern because of competition from other pubs and cheap supermarket booze.

A planning application has been submitted to Oxford City Council for one two-bedroom flat and two one-bedroom flats.

Mr Allinson said: “The membership dwindled and it wasn’t economically viable.

Gradually it dwindled because people don’t drink and drive, so getting there is more difficult. It had its heyday probably 30 or 40 years ago.”

The former chapel had about 100 members when it closed but its “shabby” interior was in need of major work.

He said: “There have been a number of clubs on the Abingdon Road that have closed because there isn’t the demand. It is the economy as much as anything.

“Cheap booze from supermarkets is obviously going to have an impact.

“There is competition. The pubs adjust their prices to put others out of business.

“It is dog-eat-dog in the licensed trade at the moment.”

City council leader and Hinksey Park ward councillor Bob Price said: “The club was very popular for many years but I don’t think it is a huge loss for the area.”

The community centre in Lake Street and pubs such as the Crooked Pot and Folly Bridge Inn served residents well, he said. But Mr Price said of the flats plan: “It is an area where there is no car parking at all. It could be jammed.”

Clubs that used to be the hub of Oxford communities have bitten the dust in recent years as drinkers’ habits change.

Last month we reported that plans to sell the closed Lord Nuffield Club in Cowley as a conference centre had fallen through. And permission was given last year to knock down the Wolvercote Social Public House, used by the British Legion, in Ulfgar Road.

Local Businesses

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree