Nostalgia night aims to boost rail service

Oxford Mail: A train to Kingham at Chipping Norton station in 1962, just months before the branch line closed A train to Kingham at Chipping Norton station in 1962, just months before the branch line closed

EFFORTS to improve train services at a West Oxfordshire station will be given a boost by an evening of railway nostalgia on Saturday.

Ascott-under-Wychwood station, on the Cotswold Line between Oxford and Worcester, is currently served by just two trains a day from Mondays to Fridays.

But the Cotswold Line Promotion Group, which represents passengers, wants to see more weekday trains and the reinstatement of Saturday services.

To help focus attention on its campaign, the CLPG is staging a film show at the village's Tiddy Hall, with Rail archivist Michael Clemens showing cine-films shot by his father Jim in the 1950s and 1960s.

As well as the Cotswold Line, there will be footage of the old branches from Yarnton Junction to Eynsham, Witney, Carterton and Fairford and from Kingham to Chipping Norton.

Doors at the hall, in Shipton Road, will open at 7pm, with the film show starting at 7.30pm. Tickets cost £5 on the door.

The CLPG says that although facilities at Ascott-under-Wychwood station were improved last year as part of Network Rail’s £67m Cotswold Line track redoubling project, with a new second platform and an extension to the existing platform built, it has yet to get any extra services.

CLPG publicity officer Julian Palfrey said: “The group is committed to improving the service for Ascott villagers to match the improvements in facilities at the station.

"With the help of First Great Western we trialled additional shoppers’ services on Saturdays before Christmas last year, with dozens of passengers travelling to Oxford, London and Worcester, and we hope to be able to build on that success to improve the level of services generally from Ascott.”

FGW said two years ago it was keen to improve services at the station and was also looking at ways to provide a railbus link to nearby Burford.

It is not yet known if these proposals will form part of the company’s bid to win a new 15-year franchise to operate trains in the Great Western region from next year.

Michael Clemens is also showing the films of West Oxfordshire’s railways at Chipping Norton Railway Club’s monthly meeting next Tuesday. Visitors are welcome to attend the meeting, which starts in the town hall at 7.30pm. Tickets cost £2.

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

4:51pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Myron Blatz says...

It is said that Charlbury was only saved from closure because at the time, Sir Peter Parker lived in the area. So, maybe those wishing to re-open stations or get better local train services should solicit the help and support of local MPs and Councillors, together with other prominent people such as film and tv personalities who seem to be found in and around rural Oxfordshire. Sad truth for many living in rural parts is that bus services quite often didn't replace trains, and where they did, these are far more restricted than in places like the Parish of Blackbird Leys - where locals moan if they have to wait more than four minutes for a bus!
It is said that Charlbury was only saved from closure because at the time, Sir Peter Parker lived in the area. So, maybe those wishing to re-open stations or get better local train services should solicit the help and support of local MPs and Councillors, together with other prominent people such as film and tv personalities who seem to be found in and around rural Oxfordshire. Sad truth for many living in rural parts is that bus services quite often didn't replace trains, and where they did, these are far more restricted than in places like the Parish of Blackbird Leys - where locals moan if they have to wait more than four minutes for a bus! Myron Blatz

12:01am Wed 26 Sep 12

jimm says...

Don't know who says that about Charlbury, because it's just not true. Only time there was any suggestion that the station might close was in the 1960s, long before Sir Peter, who often used the station to travel from his home in Minster Lovell to London, became BR chairman in 1976.
Don't know who says that about Charlbury, because it's just not true. Only time there was any suggestion that the station might close was in the 1960s, long before Sir Peter, who often used the station to travel from his home in Minster Lovell to London, became BR chairman in 1976. jimm

12:05am Wed 26 Sep 12

jimm says...

Who says that about Charlbury? Only time it might have been at risk was in the mid-1960s (a decade before Sir Peter became BR chairman) and changes to the timetable in the late 60s saw most trains on the line calling at Charlbury and passenger traffic taking off, which eventually led to it overtaking Evesham as the busiest station between Oxford and Worcester. Not bad for a town of just 3,000 people, against Evesham's 20-odd thousand.
Who says that about Charlbury? Only time it might have been at risk was in the mid-1960s (a decade before Sir Peter became BR chairman) and changes to the timetable in the late 60s saw most trains on the line calling at Charlbury and passenger traffic taking off, which eventually led to it overtaking Evesham as the busiest station between Oxford and Worcester. Not bad for a town of just 3,000 people, against Evesham's 20-odd thousand. jimm

8:42am Wed 26 Sep 12

King Joke says...

The issue with BBL is not the frequency, which is excellent, but the journey time. On paper it's 25 min to the city centre, but can easily be 30 or 40 if a lot of people are shopping at Cowley in singly-occupied cars or some 'king idiot is unloading a van on the Cowley Rd rather than walking 100 m from a side road.
The issue with BBL is not the frequency, which is excellent, but the journey time. On paper it's 25 min to the city centre, but can easily be 30 or 40 if a lot of people are shopping at Cowley in singly-occupied cars or some 'king idiot is unloading a van on the Cowley Rd rather than walking 100 m from a side road. King Joke

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree