Residents to be quizzed on parking permits plan

Old Marston Parish Council chairman Charlie Haynes, front, with clerk Tim Cann want action to tackle commuter parking in the village

Old Marston Parish Council chairman Charlie Haynes, front, with clerk Tim Cann want action to tackle commuter parking in the village Buy this photo

First published in News Oxford Mail: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter covering Headington and Marston. Call me on (01865) 425411

RESIDENTS fighting for parking permits have won support from Oxfordshire County Council but no promise of money to pay for them.

The county council has said it will seek residents’ views on how much support there is for the plans, following a public meeting last month to discuss the plans with the council’s David Tole, of the traffic regulation order team.

Spokesman Martin Crabtree said: “In principle the county council is supportive of residents’ parking schemes in areas such as this but currently there is no funding identified for implementing a scheme in the Marston area.

“We recently attended a meeting organised by the parish council and it was agreed that they will carry out a new survey of residents to ascertain the level of support for taking action.

“The county council will assist the parish in formulating the survey questions, using the experience gained in other areas.”

Residents have long complained commuters and workers from the John Radcliffe Hospital and Oxford Brookes University park on their streets.

Cherwell Drive, Ewin Close, Elms Drive, Horeseman Close and Ashlong Road are often cited as the worst hit.

Marston Parish Council chairman Charlie Haynes said: “The meeting was exceptionally well-attended and obviously people are extremely vocal.

“I’m sure Mr Tole appreciates the parishioner’s concerns as well as the parish council’s and we hope to see the ball moving a lot quicker than it has done.”

Mr Haynes added that the problem was worse during term times when buses sometimes struggle to pass because the roads are so congested.

He said: “Sometimes two buses will come along and they can’t do anything because the streets are gridlocked.

“People can’t get into their driveways and cars are left for days on end.”

Mick Haines, an independent Marston councillor on Oxford City Council, is seeking 1,000 signatures on a petition calling for action.

He said: “I want us all to work together to get a solution to the problem.

“People say they have not got the money but it always seems that they can find the money if it’s something desperate they want to have – it just seems there’s no money when it comes to Marston.”

An Oxford Brookes spokesman said it was aware of concerns and it provides parking for staff.

He said: “Oxford Brookes University has regular meetings with the local community and works collaboratively to address any difficulties. The university has met with local councillors specifically on this issue to discuss the various contributory factors.”

Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust commercial and estate director Mark Trumper said: “We are disappointed if staff park in a way which causes difficulties for local residents, and it is something we strongly discourage.

“We would welcome the opportunity to develop more on-site parking to enable staff, patients and visitors to park at the hospital itself, and remove the burden from local neighbours.”

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Comments (7)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

7:57pm Tue 12 Aug 14

HomerSimpsonDoh says...

No funds? This cheating County Council make thousands out of parking permits, so more lies from them.
No funds? This cheating County Council make thousands out of parking permits, so more lies from them. HomerSimpsonDoh
  • Score: 4

8:51pm Tue 12 Aug 14

mytaxes says...

We used to have residents only free parking until the county conducted a "survey" and decided all areas should be the same and started charging us., complete rip off.
We used to have residents only free parking until the county conducted a "survey" and decided all areas should be the same and started charging us., complete rip off. mytaxes
  • Score: 3

9:37pm Tue 12 Aug 14

Myron Blatz says...

We used to have ....... homes where the only occupants were the owners and their families/whoever, and classed C3. Today, across Oxford and other towns in Oxfordshire we have the phenomena called @Houses of Multiple Occupancy oe HMOs, classed as C4, and where there might be - say - up to six people living in the house. Not only does this cause overload on parking in the locality and across entire communities, but also means local authorities such as Oxford City Council and the County Council can make loadsa money from charging for permits - there could be (say) six cars, instead of one or two per house. Moreover, there is the added revenue income 'bonus' from HMOs potentially yielding Council Tax from persons residing in those HMOs - and especially where houses are converted and/or expanded into individual Flats - not to mention all those 'personal gyms' which have blossomed in the back gardens of many semi-detached houses, over the past decade or so! The problem isn't helped by the fact that there isn't (as yet) specific Government legislation to force property owners and landlords to provide adequate off-street parking, the problem of on-street parking just gets worse - and especially in urban and even suburban Oxford, where 20th century private and council housing estates and developments were never designed or planned for the veritable 'onslaught' of private cars and all those people with vans which now litter our streets. While in fairness to Oxford City Council, it has tried to regulate HMOs, but not the cars and vans which have swamped entire communities - especially near to commuter bus and train routes. Nor has the trend to convert off-street car parks into student and other types of accommodation helped the growth in car-ownership by students - with Oxford Brookes and other academic 'factories' being the source of outrage by residents across the City. Also, that charging for parking in some areas can often mean that the problem just moves NIMBY-like to another street or area close-by, where there aren't parking restrictions, or no residential parking in-force. Yet nobody really seems to have a 'lasting solution' to these parking-related problems, and the very real stress it causes - or do you?
We used to have ....... homes where the only occupants were the owners and their families/whoever, and classed C3. Today, across Oxford and other towns in Oxfordshire we have the phenomena called @Houses of Multiple Occupancy oe HMOs, classed as C4, and where there might be - say - up to six people living in the house. Not only does this cause overload on parking in the locality and across entire communities, but also means local authorities such as Oxford City Council and the County Council can make loadsa money from charging for permits - there could be (say) six cars, instead of one or two per house. Moreover, there is the added revenue income 'bonus' from HMOs potentially yielding Council Tax from persons residing in those HMOs - and especially where houses are converted and/or expanded into individual Flats - not to mention all those 'personal gyms' which have blossomed in the back gardens of many semi-detached houses, over the past decade or so! The problem isn't helped by the fact that there isn't (as yet) specific Government legislation to force property owners and landlords to provide adequate off-street parking, the problem of on-street parking just gets worse - and especially in urban and even suburban Oxford, where 20th century private and council housing estates and developments were never designed or planned for the veritable 'onslaught' of private cars and all those people with vans which now litter our streets. While in fairness to Oxford City Council, it has tried to regulate HMOs, but not the cars and vans which have swamped entire communities - especially near to commuter bus and train routes. Nor has the trend to convert off-street car parks into student and other types of accommodation helped the growth in car-ownership by students - with Oxford Brookes and other academic 'factories' being the source of outrage by residents across the City. Also, that charging for parking in some areas can often mean that the problem just moves NIMBY-like to another street or area close-by, where there aren't parking restrictions, or no residential parking in-force. Yet nobody really seems to have a 'lasting solution' to these parking-related problems, and the very real stress it causes - or do you? Myron Blatz
  • Score: 1

9:47pm Tue 12 Aug 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

Myron Blatz wrote:
We used to have ....... homes where the only occupants were the owners and their families/whoever, and classed C3. Today, across Oxford and other towns in Oxfordshire we have the phenomena called @Houses of Multiple Occupancy oe HMOs, classed as C4, and where there might be - say - up to six people living in the house. Not only does this cause overload on parking in the locality and across entire communities, but also means local authorities such as Oxford City Council and the County Council can make loadsa money from charging for permits - there could be (say) six cars, instead of one or two per house. Moreover, there is the added revenue income 'bonus' from HMOs potentially yielding Council Tax from persons residing in those HMOs - and especially where houses are converted and/or expanded into individual Flats - not to mention all those 'personal gyms' which have blossomed in the back gardens of many semi-detached houses, over the past decade or so! The problem isn't helped by the fact that there isn't (as yet) specific Government legislation to force property owners and landlords to provide adequate off-street parking, the problem of on-street parking just gets worse - and especially in urban and even suburban Oxford, where 20th century private and council housing estates and developments were never designed or planned for the veritable 'onslaught' of private cars and all those people with vans which now litter our streets. While in fairness to Oxford City Council, it has tried to regulate HMOs, but not the cars and vans which have swamped entire communities - especially near to commuter bus and train routes. Nor has the trend to convert off-street car parks into student and other types of accommodation helped the growth in car-ownership by students - with Oxford Brookes and other academic 'factories' being the source of outrage by residents across the City. Also, that charging for parking in some areas can often mean that the problem just moves NIMBY-like to another street or area close-by, where there aren't parking restrictions, or no residential parking in-force. Yet nobody really seems to have a 'lasting solution' to these parking-related problems, and the very real stress it causes - or do you?
The solution is simple. First of all use paragraphs...

Secondly, auction parking permits to the highest bidder.
[quote][p][bold]Myron Blatz[/bold] wrote: We used to have ....... homes where the only occupants were the owners and their families/whoever, and classed C3. Today, across Oxford and other towns in Oxfordshire we have the phenomena called @Houses of Multiple Occupancy oe HMOs, classed as C4, and where there might be - say - up to six people living in the house. Not only does this cause overload on parking in the locality and across entire communities, but also means local authorities such as Oxford City Council and the County Council can make loadsa money from charging for permits - there could be (say) six cars, instead of one or two per house. Moreover, there is the added revenue income 'bonus' from HMOs potentially yielding Council Tax from persons residing in those HMOs - and especially where houses are converted and/or expanded into individual Flats - not to mention all those 'personal gyms' which have blossomed in the back gardens of many semi-detached houses, over the past decade or so! The problem isn't helped by the fact that there isn't (as yet) specific Government legislation to force property owners and landlords to provide adequate off-street parking, the problem of on-street parking just gets worse - and especially in urban and even suburban Oxford, where 20th century private and council housing estates and developments were never designed or planned for the veritable 'onslaught' of private cars and all those people with vans which now litter our streets. While in fairness to Oxford City Council, it has tried to regulate HMOs, but not the cars and vans which have swamped entire communities - especially near to commuter bus and train routes. Nor has the trend to convert off-street car parks into student and other types of accommodation helped the growth in car-ownership by students - with Oxford Brookes and other academic 'factories' being the source of outrage by residents across the City. Also, that charging for parking in some areas can often mean that the problem just moves NIMBY-like to another street or area close-by, where there aren't parking restrictions, or no residential parking in-force. Yet nobody really seems to have a 'lasting solution' to these parking-related problems, and the very real stress it causes - or do you?[/p][/quote]The solution is simple. First of all use paragraphs... Secondly, auction parking permits to the highest bidder. Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: -4

9:53pm Tue 12 Aug 14

Sandy Wimpole-Smythe says...

Andrew:Oxford wrote:
Myron Blatz wrote:
We used to have ....... homes where the only occupants were the owners and their families/whoever, and classed C3. Today, across Oxford and other towns in Oxfordshire we have the phenomena called @Houses of Multiple Occupancy oe HMOs, classed as C4, and where there might be - say - up to six people living in the house. Not only does this cause overload on parking in the locality and across entire communities, but also means local authorities such as Oxford City Council and the County Council can make loadsa money from charging for permits - there could be (say) six cars, instead of one or two per house. Moreover, there is the added revenue income 'bonus' from HMOs potentially yielding Council Tax from persons residing in those HMOs - and especially where houses are converted and/or expanded into individual Flats - not to mention all those 'personal gyms' which have blossomed in the back gardens of many semi-detached houses, over the past decade or so! The problem isn't helped by the fact that there isn't (as yet) specific Government legislation to force property owners and landlords to provide adequate off-street parking, the problem of on-street parking just gets worse - and especially in urban and even suburban Oxford, where 20th century private and council housing estates and developments were never designed or planned for the veritable 'onslaught' of private cars and all those people with vans which now litter our streets. While in fairness to Oxford City Council, it has tried to regulate HMOs, but not the cars and vans which have swamped entire communities - especially near to commuter bus and train routes. Nor has the trend to convert off-street car parks into student and other types of accommodation helped the growth in car-ownership by students - with Oxford Brookes and other academic 'factories' being the source of outrage by residents across the City. Also, that charging for parking in some areas can often mean that the problem just moves NIMBY-like to another street or area close-by, where there aren't parking restrictions, or no residential parking in-force. Yet nobody really seems to have a 'lasting solution' to these parking-related problems, and the very real stress it causes - or do you?
The solution is simple. First of all use paragraphs...

Secondly, auction parking permits to the highest bidder.
So a cleaner on £7 per hour looses out to a better paid person despite possibly having a greater need for a car. Great idea, not.
[quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Myron Blatz[/bold] wrote: We used to have ....... homes where the only occupants were the owners and their families/whoever, and classed C3. Today, across Oxford and other towns in Oxfordshire we have the phenomena called @Houses of Multiple Occupancy oe HMOs, classed as C4, and where there might be - say - up to six people living in the house. Not only does this cause overload on parking in the locality and across entire communities, but also means local authorities such as Oxford City Council and the County Council can make loadsa money from charging for permits - there could be (say) six cars, instead of one or two per house. Moreover, there is the added revenue income 'bonus' from HMOs potentially yielding Council Tax from persons residing in those HMOs - and especially where houses are converted and/or expanded into individual Flats - not to mention all those 'personal gyms' which have blossomed in the back gardens of many semi-detached houses, over the past decade or so! The problem isn't helped by the fact that there isn't (as yet) specific Government legislation to force property owners and landlords to provide adequate off-street parking, the problem of on-street parking just gets worse - and especially in urban and even suburban Oxford, where 20th century private and council housing estates and developments were never designed or planned for the veritable 'onslaught' of private cars and all those people with vans which now litter our streets. While in fairness to Oxford City Council, it has tried to regulate HMOs, but not the cars and vans which have swamped entire communities - especially near to commuter bus and train routes. Nor has the trend to convert off-street car parks into student and other types of accommodation helped the growth in car-ownership by students - with Oxford Brookes and other academic 'factories' being the source of outrage by residents across the City. Also, that charging for parking in some areas can often mean that the problem just moves NIMBY-like to another street or area close-by, where there aren't parking restrictions, or no residential parking in-force. Yet nobody really seems to have a 'lasting solution' to these parking-related problems, and the very real stress it causes - or do you?[/p][/quote]The solution is simple. First of all use paragraphs... Secondly, auction parking permits to the highest bidder.[/p][/quote]So a cleaner on £7 per hour looses out to a better paid person despite possibly having a greater need for a car. Great idea, not. Sandy Wimpole-Smythe
  • Score: 3

12:27am Wed 13 Aug 14

Myron Blatz says...

Couldn't agree more, Sandy Wimpole-Smythe.
Couldn't agree more, Sandy Wimpole-Smythe. Myron Blatz
  • Score: 1

7:19am Wed 13 Aug 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

Sandy Wimpole-Smythe wrote:
Andrew:Oxford wrote:
Myron Blatz wrote:
We used to have ....... homes where the only occupants were the owners and their families/whoever, and classed C3. Today, across Oxford and other towns in Oxfordshire we have the phenomena called @Houses of Multiple Occupancy oe HMOs, classed as C4, and where there might be - say - up to six people living in the house. Not only does this cause overload on parking in the locality and across entire communities, but also means local authorities such as Oxford City Council and the County Council can make loadsa money from charging for permits - there could be (say) six cars, instead of one or two per house. Moreover, there is the added revenue income 'bonus' from HMOs potentially yielding Council Tax from persons residing in those HMOs - and especially where houses are converted and/or expanded into individual Flats - not to mention all those 'personal gyms' which have blossomed in the back gardens of many semi-detached houses, over the past decade or so! The problem isn't helped by the fact that there isn't (as yet) specific Government legislation to force property owners and landlords to provide adequate off-street parking, the problem of on-street parking just gets worse - and especially in urban and even suburban Oxford, where 20th century private and council housing estates and developments were never designed or planned for the veritable 'onslaught' of private cars and all those people with vans which now litter our streets. While in fairness to Oxford City Council, it has tried to regulate HMOs, but not the cars and vans which have swamped entire communities - especially near to commuter bus and train routes. Nor has the trend to convert off-street car parks into student and other types of accommodation helped the growth in car-ownership by students - with Oxford Brookes and other academic 'factories' being the source of outrage by residents across the City. Also, that charging for parking in some areas can often mean that the problem just moves NIMBY-like to another street or area close-by, where there aren't parking restrictions, or no residential parking in-force. Yet nobody really seems to have a 'lasting solution' to these parking-related problems, and the very real stress it causes - or do you?
The solution is simple. First of all use paragraphs...

Secondly, auction parking permits to the highest bidder.
So a cleaner on £7 per hour looses out to a better paid person despite possibly having a greater need for a car. Great idea, not.
That happens anyway...

In some parts of Oxford you are not entitled to apply for a parking permit if your home was built after a certain date.

So if you choose to buy or rent a property without off-street parking in those areas you can't park at all - unless you can afford private parking rates.

Don't forget, if you live in Marston and have a drive, once a CPZ comes in you'll be able to earn £25-£30 a week leasing out your drive to Brookes Students and NHS staff - whilst parking on the street with your permit!
[quote][p][bold]Sandy Wimpole-Smythe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Myron Blatz[/bold] wrote: We used to have ....... homes where the only occupants were the owners and their families/whoever, and classed C3. Today, across Oxford and other towns in Oxfordshire we have the phenomena called @Houses of Multiple Occupancy oe HMOs, classed as C4, and where there might be - say - up to six people living in the house. Not only does this cause overload on parking in the locality and across entire communities, but also means local authorities such as Oxford City Council and the County Council can make loadsa money from charging for permits - there could be (say) six cars, instead of one or two per house. Moreover, there is the added revenue income 'bonus' from HMOs potentially yielding Council Tax from persons residing in those HMOs - and especially where houses are converted and/or expanded into individual Flats - not to mention all those 'personal gyms' which have blossomed in the back gardens of many semi-detached houses, over the past decade or so! The problem isn't helped by the fact that there isn't (as yet) specific Government legislation to force property owners and landlords to provide adequate off-street parking, the problem of on-street parking just gets worse - and especially in urban and even suburban Oxford, where 20th century private and council housing estates and developments were never designed or planned for the veritable 'onslaught' of private cars and all those people with vans which now litter our streets. While in fairness to Oxford City Council, it has tried to regulate HMOs, but not the cars and vans which have swamped entire communities - especially near to commuter bus and train routes. Nor has the trend to convert off-street car parks into student and other types of accommodation helped the growth in car-ownership by students - with Oxford Brookes and other academic 'factories' being the source of outrage by residents across the City. Also, that charging for parking in some areas can often mean that the problem just moves NIMBY-like to another street or area close-by, where there aren't parking restrictions, or no residential parking in-force. Yet nobody really seems to have a 'lasting solution' to these parking-related problems, and the very real stress it causes - or do you?[/p][/quote]The solution is simple. First of all use paragraphs... Secondly, auction parking permits to the highest bidder.[/p][/quote]So a cleaner on £7 per hour looses out to a better paid person despite possibly having a greater need for a car. Great idea, not.[/p][/quote]That happens anyway... In some parts of Oxford you are not entitled to apply for a parking permit if your home was built after a certain date. So if you choose to buy or rent a property without off-street parking in those areas you can't park at all - unless you can afford private parking rates. Don't forget, if you live in Marston and have a drive, once a CPZ comes in you'll be able to earn £25-£30 a week leasing out your drive to Brookes Students and NHS staff - whilst parking on the street with your permit! Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: 0

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